Self-Care

Keeping a well stocked medicine cabinet at home can help you treat many minor ailments. Colds, coughs, indigestion and many other minor complaints can all be treated with medicines that are available over the counter.

Your pharmacist can advise on what you might find useful to keep in your medicine cabinet. Always follow the instructions on the medicine label and consult your doctor if the illness continues or becomes more severe.

+ Your Local Pharmacist

Pharmacists offer professional free health advice at any time - you don't need an appointment. From coughs and colds to aches and pains, they can give you expert help on everyday illnesses. They can answer questions about prescribed and over-the-counter medicines. Your local Pharmacist can also advise on healthy eating.

Pharmacists can also advise on health eating, obesity and giving up smoking. Some pharmacists have private areas where you can talk in confidence. They may suggest you visit your GP for more serious symptoms. It is possible to purchase many medicines from the chemist without a prescription.

+ Diarrhoea

Acute diarrhoea is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection and affects almost everyone from time to time. A common cause in both children and adults is gastroenteritis, an infection of the bowel.

Bouts of diarrhoea in adults may also be brought on by anxiety or drinking too much coffee or alcohol. Diarrhoea may also be a side effect of a medication

NHS Choices

  • Symptoms, causes, treatment and information

BBC Health

  • Causes, prevention and treatment from BBC Health

Macmillan Cancer Support

  • Diarrhoea as a result of cancer treatments

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

+ Coughs & Colds

A cold is a mild viral infection of the nose, throat, sinuses and upper airways. It can cause nasal stuffiness, a runny nose, sneezing, a sore throat and a cough. Usually it's a self-limiting infection – this means it gets better by itself without the need for treatment.

On average, adults have two to five colds each year and school-age children can have up to eight colds a year. Adults who come into contact with children tend to get more colds. This is because children usually carry more of the virus, for longer.

In the UK, you’re more likely to get a cold during the winter months although the reasons why aren’t fully understood at present.

Treatment of a cold

For most people, a cold will get better on its own within a week of the symptoms starting without any specific treatment. However, there are treatments that can help to ease your symptoms and make you feel more comfortable. These are available from your pharmacy, which means that you can treat yourself, rather than needing to see your GP.

There is no cure for colds. Antibiotics, which treat infections caused by bacteria, don't work on cold viruses.

Drinking enough fluids to prevent dehydration. Steam inhalations with menthol, salt water nasal sprays or drops may be helpful. Vapour rubs may help relieve symptoms for children. Hot drinks (particularly with lemon), hot soups and spicy foods can help to ease irritation and pain in your throat. Sucking sweets or lozenges which contain menthol or eucalyptus may sooth your throat. Gargling with salt water may help a sore throat. You should try to make sure you get enough rest if you have a cold. It’s not usually necessary to stay off work or school.

NHS Choices - is it the common cold of the flu

  • Colds and flu can share some of the same symptoms (sneezing, coughing, sore throat) but are caused by different viruses, and flu can be much more serious. Find out

Self-Care Information

Parent Guide to Coughs, Colds, Earache & Sore Throats

This booklet gives advice on common infections in children over 3 months old.  

Caring for Children With Coughs

This booklet gives information about how to look after a child with a non-asthma related cough. 

Patient.info

An independent health platform that provides information on health and disease. 

 

First Aid - MP3 Downloads

To save them on your computer, right-click on any of the links below and then click 'Save Target As..." .  Click on any of the links below to play the audio files: 

Burns - Explains the immediate treatment for burns and scalds.

Fits  - How to deal with fits (convulsions/seizures) in adults and young children.

Wounds   - Immediate actions for wounds, bleeding, and bleeding associated with fractures.

Unconscious patient who is breathing - How to deal with an unrousable patient who IS breathing (includes recovery position)

CPR for adults -  Adults who have collapsed, unrousable and NOT breathing.

CPR for babies - Babies who are unrousable and NOT breathing.

Collapsed patient in detail -  Explains the complete scenario including checks for breathing, circulation, etc.

These files have been prepared by Sussex Ambulance Service and comply with European Resuscitation Council Guidelines.

Other Links

British Red Cross - First Aid Tips
Simple, straightforward and easy to understand first aid tips

BBC Health - First Aid
This site has information about how to react to common injuries and emergencies.

St Johns Ambulance
St John Ambulance believes that everyone should learn at least the basic first aid techniques.

Home First Aid Kit
All you need to know about preparing and storing your own first aid kit

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.